The Case of the Curious Bride

Talkie of the Week: The Case of the Curious Bride

USA 1935, 80 minutes, black & white, Warner Bros.. Director: Michael Curtiz, Written by Tom Reed with additional dialog by Brown Holmes, Based on the novel Perry Mason and the Case of the Curious Bride by Erle Stanley Gardner. Cast: Warren William, Claire Dodd, Allen Jenkins, Margaret Lindsay, Donald Woods, Phillip Reed, Barton MacLane, Wini Shaw, Warren Hymer, Olin Howland, Charles Richman, Errol Flynn

Plot summary: Perry Mason is about to head off to China when he’s approached by an old lady friend of his who charms him into postponing his trip by neglecting a beaded purse that contains a gun.

Review: The Case of the Curious Bride was the second adaptation out of four Warner Bros. produced with Warren William as Erle Stanley Gardner’s famous lawyer Perry Mason. After a rather straightforward first adaptation of The Case of the Howling Dog, the second Perry Mason was spiced up with comedic elements and a platinum blond Della Street, dipping into the waters of box office sensation The Thin Man.

Although losing some of the original tone of the novel, The Case of the Curious Bride did not fail to introduce Mason’s favorite private eye Paul Drake. Renamed Spudsy to fit the lighthearted atmosphere of the detective flick, his role is a lot less feasible than in the book but entertaining nonetheless. Della Street, although not spoiled with too much screen time, was turned into a private secretary of sorts, one who never failed to insinuate that Perry only believed to be the boss.Her interaction with Perry is naturally quick-witted and hilarious at times, right down to the always included touch of romance.

All in all, The Case of the Curious Bride is a good eighty minutes of suspense, laughs and clever dialog. Warren William is a wonderful Perry Mason, gentlemanly, clever and quick on his toes. Claire Dodd is his darling girl Friday, reliable in her deliveries and a great joy to watch. If you’re looking for a light movie to make you smile, this 1930s Perry Mason will do the trick. Just don’t expect a complete realization of Gardner’s novel. It’s fair to say this adaptation is an interpretation of it and you either enjoy a decent cast of actors (including Errol Flynn) and an upbeat plot, or you don’t. But give it a chance. I am a big fan of the Perry Mason of the 1950s, and I greatly enjoyed this flick.

Available online.

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The Case of the Howling Dog

Talkie of the Week: The Case of the Howling Dog

USA 1934, 75 minutes, black & white, Warner Bros.. Director: Alan Crosland, Written by Ben Markson, Based on the novel “Perry Mason and the Case of the Howling Dog” by Erle Stanley Gardner. Cast: Warren William, Helen Trenholme, Mary Astor, Allen Jenkins, Gordon Westcott, Grant Mitchell, Helen Lowell, Dorothy Tree, Russell Hicks

Plot summary: Arthur Cartwright complains to Perry Mason about his neighbor’s howling dog, a symbol for death in the neighborhood he believes.

Review: The Case of the Howling Dog was the first in a series of four Perry Mason adaptations immediately following the success of Erle Stanley Gardner’s first mystery novels in 1933. Starring Warren William as Perry Mason and Helen Trenholme as Della Street, the first movie picked up a lot of the whodunit’s original spice, including the tingling romance between the attorney and his confidential secretary.

Later rewritten as a Nick Charles character, this first Perry Mason is a lawyer who’s seriously committed to his clients as well as to the law. Although bending the law at times to solve his case, Mason is always a respectable character who likes to be one step ahead of the police and the DA. Although usually supported by his private investigator friend Paul Drake in the books, the film does not feature the entertaining sidekick character – a real loss to the story. However, Warren William’s performance is strong enough to make up for this oversight. His shyster attitude brings a lot of suspense and drive into a misty story that keeps Perry Mason as well as his audience on the toes until the very end.

He is supported by a loyal, reliable and earthy Della Street who tackles the right amount of sass and allure Gardner so beautifully describes in his books. Helen Trenholme is present and unobtrusive enough to give a convincing portrayal of Mason‘s confidante. Although meeting the original’s criteria, Miss Trenholme did not get a chance to breathe life into the tweaked version of Della in The Case of the Curious Bride one year later. She was replaced by platinum blonde Claire Dodd who brought her very own qualities to presenting a likable but somewhat quirked up version of Perry Mason‘s dedicated secretary.

All in all, The Case of the Howling Dog is a decent mystery movie from the 1930s: entertaining, thrilling and fun to watch. It is a treat for every Perry Mason fan who appreciates the books, radio plays and the iconic TV show from the fifties and sixties. It is a good adaptation, making the most of the original story in only 75 short minutes of film. Warren William offers an interesting take on Gardner’s character which may be of great interest to any Raymond Burr fan. The Case of the Howling Dog, when compared to the books and TV show, is probably the best of Warner’s four consecutive Perry Mason films. A gem that’s definitely worth watching.

Available online.