The Case of the Velvet Claws

Talkie of the Week: The Case of the Velvet Claws

USA 1936, 63 minutes, black & white, Warner Bros.. Director: William Clemens, Written by Tom Reed, Based on the novel Perry Mason and the Case of the Velvet Claws by Erle Stanley Gardner. Cast: Warren William, Claire Dodd, Wini Shaw, Bill Elliott, Joe King, Addison Richards, Eddie Acuff, Olin Howland, Dick Purcell, Kenneth Harlan, Clara Blandick

Plot summary: Perry Mason is getting married to Della Street and lays off his honeymoon to solve a case of a scheming young woman.

Review: In The Case of the Velvet Claws, Warren Williams returned to the screen as successful attorney Perry Mason, spiced up and almost goofy, adding some comic relief to an otherwise obscure story. Reduced to a screwball comedian in his fourth and last performance as shyster Mason, he was teamed up with the Della Street from his second movie, The Case of the Curious Bride, Claire Dodd. Feeding off their on screen chemistry, Della became Mrs. Mason right in the beginning of this adaptation and then invisible, for the most part, diminished to being a bystander rather than the always so loyal and efficient secretary. Although based on the flirtations between Della and Perry in the original books, the movie did not manage to make the story work as it should have. Unfortunately I might add, because the idea answered the romantic hopes of many fans before it reminded them why, in the novels, Della never went beyond an ardent kiss with her lawyer boss.

For the fourth Perry Mason adaptation, Warner Bros. picked the first novel that introduced the famous lawyer and his secretary. Although using the title and general theme of the original book, the movie did not have much in common with Gardner’s fast-paced plot. His Eva Belter was a much bigger challenge to Perry Mason and Della Street showed a lot more edge. Although it’s always hard to translate a written story into a moving picture, this attempt did not even seem to try to resemble the original text. It is rather a reflection of its day and age as the studio was still trying to copy the success of The Thin Man series.

The Case of the Velvet Claws has not much on the famous TV show of the 1950s and 60s either, apart from an always brilliant Warren William. It is unfortunate that he didn’t get a chance to shine as much as in his first Mason endeavor, but for true fans of the character(s), this movie is still a worthwhile addition to their collection.

Available online.

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The Case of the Curious Bride

Talkie of the Week: The Case of the Curious Bride

USA 1935, 80 minutes, black & white, Warner Bros.. Director: Michael Curtiz, Written by Tom Reed with additional dialog by Brown Holmes, Based on the novel Perry Mason and the Case of the Curious Bride by Erle Stanley Gardner. Cast: Warren William, Claire Dodd, Allen Jenkins, Margaret Lindsay, Donald Woods, Phillip Reed, Barton MacLane, Wini Shaw, Warren Hymer, Olin Howland, Charles Richman, Errol Flynn

Plot summary: Perry Mason is about to head off to China when he’s approached by an old lady friend of his who charms him into postponing his trip by neglecting a beaded purse that contains a gun.

Review: The Case of the Curious Bride was the second adaptation out of four Warner Bros. produced with Warren William as Erle Stanley Gardner’s famous lawyer Perry Mason. After a rather straightforward first adaptation of The Case of the Howling Dog, the second Perry Mason was spiced up with comedic elements and a platinum blond Della Street, dipping into the waters of box office sensation The Thin Man.

Although losing some of the original tone of the novel, The Case of the Curious Bride did not fail to introduce Mason’s favorite private eye Paul Drake. Renamed Spudsy to fit the lighthearted atmosphere of the detective flick, his role is a lot less feasible than in the book but entertaining nonetheless. Della Street, although not spoiled with too much screen time, was turned into a private secretary of sorts, one who never failed to insinuate that Perry only believed to be the boss.Her interaction with Perry is naturally quick-witted and hilarious at times, right down to the always included touch of romance.

All in all, The Case of the Curious Bride is a good eighty minutes of suspense, laughs and clever dialog. Warren William is a wonderful Perry Mason, gentlemanly, clever and quick on his toes. Claire Dodd is his darling girl Friday, reliable in her deliveries and a great joy to watch. If you’re looking for a light movie to make you smile, this 1930s Perry Mason will do the trick. Just don’t expect a complete realization of Gardner’s novel. It’s fair to say this adaptation is an interpretation of it and you either enjoy a decent cast of actors (including Errol Flynn) and an upbeat plot, or you don’t. But give it a chance. I am a big fan of the Perry Mason of the 1950s, and I greatly enjoyed this flick.

Available online.

The Case of the Lucky Legs

Talkie of the Week: The Case of the Lucky Legs

USA 1935, 77 minutes, black & white, Warner Bros. and First National Pictures. Director: Archie Mayo, Written by Jerome Chodorov, Brown Holmes and Ben Markson, Based on the novel “Perry Mason and the Case of the Lucky Legs” by Erle Stanley Gardner. Cast: Warren William, Genevieve Tobin, Patricia Eills, Lyle Talbot, Allen Jenkins, Peggy Shannon, Porter Hall, Anita Kerry, Barton Mac Lane, Craig Reynolds, Henry O’Neill, Charles C. Wilson, Joseph Crehan, Olin Howland, Mary Treen

Plot summary: To save his client Margie Clune, Perry Mason investigates the murder of Frank Patton, promoter of the so-called Lucky Legs contest, and gets in trouble himself.

Review: Erle Stanley Gardner introduced the public to Perry Mason, attorney-at-law, in The Case of the Velvet Claws in 1933. Hollywood, always eager to jump on the bandwagon of success, first adapted Mason’s Case of the Howling Dog a good year later, then altered the hero to fit the contemporary stereotype of an investigator rather than Gardner’s depicted shyster. Warren William was cast to star in a total of four consecutive films, all based on original Mason novels.

The Case of the Lucky Legs was Warner Bros. third attempt at bringing Perry Mason to the big screen without really grasping the essence of the popular whodnit. In best mystery-meets-comedy tradition, the movie was meant to entertain and presented a slick version of Gardner’s famous lawyer, resembling a variety of other celebrated investigators such as The Thin Man‘s Nick Charles or The Falcon. Warren William did a fine job at meeting the standards of this altered Mason, but the character has next to nothing on the original lawyer described in Gardner’s books.

Della Street, Mason’s famed secretary, was also spiced up but less drastically so. Her job description still remained the same, at least until the adaptation of  The Case of the Velvet Claws in 1936. In contrast to her on screen boss however, Della was portrayed by three different actresses in Warner’s four adaptations. In The Case of the Lucky Legs, Genevieve Tobin got a shot at presenting an attractively cheeky Miss Street, a job she excelled at. It is due to Miss Tobin’s enjoyable depiction of Perry Mason‘s girl Friday that the film works. In best 1930s tradition, her character is a wonderful mix of charm, sass and class, and Genevieve Tobin knew how to create chemistry with her spotlighted co-star.

An unfortunate casualty of this adaptation is Gardner’s memorable character Paul Drake, Mason’s trusted P.I. Renamed Spudsy Drake in the movie, the character was reduced to a mere shadow of his literary self, a silly handyman to lawyer-gone-detective Perry Mason who was married off to a caricature of a bad tempered wife.

All in all, The Case of the Lucky Legs is a fun movie without the complexity of Erle Stanley Gardner’s novels but a tonality of its own. The film is a comedy rather than a mystery and does not contain any courtroom scenes. It is funny on its own merit and lives on the scripted teasing between Della Street and Perry Mason, as well as on the beyond decent performances of Warren William and Genevieve Tobin. It is a must-see for any die-hard Perry Mason fan and a diverting classic for everyone else.

Available online.