The Case of the Stuttering Bishop

Talkie of the Week: The Case of the Stuttering Bishop

USA 1937, 70 minutes, black & white, Warner Bros. Director: William Clemens, Written by Kenneth Gamet and Don Ryan, Based on The Case of the Stuttering Bishop by Erle Stanley Gardner. Cast: Donald Woods, Ann Dvorak, Anne Nagel, Linda Perry, Craig Reynolds, Gordon Oliver, Joseph Crehan, Helen MacKellar, Edward McWade, Tom Kennedy, Mira McKinney, Frank Faylen, Douglas Wood, Veda Ann Borg, George Lloyd, Selmer Jackson and Charles Wilson.

Plot summary: Perry Mason gets involved in a case of identity theft and ends up defending the possible heir to a murder victim’s fortune.

TCOT Stuttering Bisop 1937Review: As the sixth and last adaptation of Erle Stanley Gardner’s popular whodunits, Warner Brothers released The Case of the Stuttering Bishop in 1937 with Donald Woods as famed lawyer Perry Mason and Ann Dvorak as his faithful girl Friday Della Street. Based on Gardner’s ninth book, the film tried to turn a difficult plot into seventy minutes of entertaining noir, unfortunately another failed attempt at the box office. For Mason fans, the film may now be a gem to complete their collection, for a general audience, however, the film did not manage to live up to Gardner’s original story.

Although blessed with Donald Woods as yet another Mason, the film, once again, lacked the enticing chemistry between Perry and and his savvy secretary, an element the radio and TV show would get down to a T in the 1940s through 60s. Ann Dvorak, despite her decent lines, brief (book-inspired) action scene and physical presence, did not manage to shine as Della Street and Joseph Crehan did not get enough screen time to actually flesh out another pivotal character from the original books, private detective Paul Drake. Charles Wilson, though, as district attorney Hamilton Burger, met the rather unlikeable persona from Gardner’s novels and Edward McWade was a charming stuttering bishop Mallory. Together, they made the film an enjoyable hour of entertainment without living up to the story’s full potential.

Despite my bias for Raymond Burr, Barbara Hale and their smash hit show from the 50s and 60s, I must admit, however, that Donald Woods did a fine job at breathing life into his very own Perry Mason. Of all the adaptations from the 1930s, The Case of the Stuttering Bishop may even qualify as my favorite, although each of the six films had its beauty and strengths. As a Mason fan, I’m grateful either way for Warner’s decision to release all of the first Mason films in one boxset on DVD – it sure made the best early Christmas gift I gave myself this year.

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Crossroads

TV classics: Crossroads

USA 1955-57, two seasons, 78 episodes, approximately 30 minutes each, ABC, black & white. Cast: Jeff Morrow, Douglass Dumbrille, Robert Carson, Frank J. Scannell, Robert Paquin, Pat O’Brien, Dorothy Green, Donald Woods, Philip Ahn, Jonathan Hale, Brian Donlevy, Richard Denning, Vincent Price, Dick Foran and many others

Plot summary: As a religious anthology series, Crossroads has a look at everyday challenges from a spiritual point of view.

Review: Focusing on the lives of clergymen from numerous denominations, predominantly Christian and Jewish, Crossroads presented a new story and cast each week to entertain and educate an audience from all backgrounds and age groups. Based on actual incidents, each episode offered answers to everyday challenges but also shed light on less common social environments and situations. In Lifeline, for example, broadcast on ABC on May 11, 1956, a young woman (Barbara Hale) seeks the help of Reverend Grumm (Regis Toomey) to salve her conscience and rescue her baby sister from the mob she herself has been working for for years. It’s stories like these that made this show so alluring and the actors who still make it worthwhile today. With selected episodes available on DVD, Crossroads is definitely not a show for agnostics, but it may fill a gap for those who are interested in spirituality and miss a certain sparkle of hope.

True Grit

Talkie of the Week: True Grit

USA 1969, 128 minutes, color, Paramount Pictures. Director: Henry Hathaway, Written by Marguerite Roberts, Based on “True Grit” by Charles Portis. Cast: John Wayne, Glen Campbell, Kim Darby, Robert Duvall, Jeff Corey, Dennis Hopper, Strother Martin, John Fiedler, Jeremy Slate, Alfred Ryder, Ron Soble, James Westerfield, John Doucette, Donald Woods, Edith Atwater, Carlos Rivas, Isabel Boniface, H. W. Gim, John Pickard, Elizabeth Harrower, Ken Renard, Jay Ripley and Kenneth Becker

Plot summary: 14-year-old Mattie Ross hires Marshall Rooster Cogburn to hunt down her father’s murderer and bring him to justice with a little help of Texas Ranger La Boeuf.

Review: True Grit was my first John Wayne Western, a fact I admit with some shame because he was such a heavy weight in Hollywood and a talented star in his fifty years on the silver screen, I should have started exploring his work much earlier than I did. But there are so many beautiful classics out there, so many favorites whose work I haven’t completely gotten my hands on just yet, John Wayne somehow fell behind as a priority. Once I did see him in True Grit, however, I felt inveigled to put him up high on my list. After all, his portrayal of Rooster Cogburn spoke to me much more than the only recently celebrated interpretation by Jeff Bridges.

Remake or original, that may be the question here to ask. Although, in 1975, John Wayne himself already reclaimed the part that had brought him his well-deserved Academy Award. In Rooster Cogburn, he starred with Katherine Hepburn, chasing after the murderer of her father, a plot that may sound slightly familiar to everyone who has seen True Grit in 1969 or 2010.  So was it so bad for the Coen Brothers to re-imagine this John Wayne classic? Well, it probably depends on how fond you are of contemporary interpretations. I didn’t like True Grit much when I saw the adaptation from 2010, but liked it better with John Wayne, Glen Campbell and Kim Darby. That said, I should add that the story itself is not my favorite, not so much for its general content, but for the character of Mattie Ross. But the original film in general is a real gem, telling the story of an interesting journey with an interesting end. So for anyone who enjoys a Western without any Indians, do pick this one as your after-dinner treat. You may be surprised how fast two hours can evaporate by watching a decent movie.

Available on DVD and BluRay. True Grit trailer available here.

The Case of the Curious Bride

Talkie of the Week: The Case of the Curious Bride

USA 1935, 80 minutes, black & white, Warner Bros.. Director: Michael Curtiz, Written by Tom Reed with additional dialog by Brown Holmes, Based on the novel Perry Mason and the Case of the Curious Bride by Erle Stanley Gardner. Cast: Warren William, Claire Dodd, Allen Jenkins, Margaret Lindsay, Donald Woods, Phillip Reed, Barton MacLane, Wini Shaw, Warren Hymer, Olin Howland, Charles Richman, Errol Flynn

Plot summary: Perry Mason is about to head off to China when he’s approached by an old lady friend of his who charms him into postponing his trip by neglecting a beaded purse that contains a gun.

Review: The Case of the Curious Bride was the second adaptation out of four Warner Bros. produced with Warren William as Erle Stanley Gardner’s famous lawyer Perry Mason. After a rather straightforward first adaptation of The Case of the Howling Dog, the second Perry Mason was spiced up with comedic elements and a platinum blond Della Street, dipping into the waters of box office sensation The Thin Man.

Although losing some of the original tone of the novel, The Case of the Curious Bride did not fail to introduce Mason’s favorite private eye Paul Drake. Renamed Spudsy to fit the lighthearted atmosphere of the detective flick, his role is a lot less feasible than in the book but entertaining nonetheless. Della Street, although not spoiled with too much screen time, was turned into a private secretary of sorts, one who never failed to insinuate that Perry only believed to be the boss.Her interaction with Perry is naturally quick-witted and hilarious at times, right down to the always included touch of romance.

All in all, The Case of the Curious Bride is a good eighty minutes of suspense, laughs and clever dialog. Warren William is a wonderful Perry Mason, gentlemanly, clever and quick on his toes. Claire Dodd is his darling girl Friday, reliable in her deliveries and a great joy to watch. If you’re looking for a light movie to make you smile, this 1930s Perry Mason will do the trick. Just don’t expect a complete realization of Gardner’s novel. It’s fair to say this adaptation is an interpretation of it and you either enjoy a decent cast of actors (including Errol Flynn) and an upbeat plot, or you don’t. But give it a chance. I am a big fan of the Perry Mason of the 1950s, and I greatly enjoyed this flick.

Available online.